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Recently i have acquired a batch of very old film. Bought them at an auction, not knowing how old they are as there wasn't any date in the selling information.

A part of that batch are ORWO films, from the former DDR, which had expired between 1966 and 1969. 

The NP10 film turned out to be quite rare, nothing on how to shoot it or how to develop it. Time for an experiment i'd say!

After asking around and reading about developing methods for very old film i decided to go for a somewhat unconventional way called the "hard, fast and cold" method. The writer of that piece had succesfully developed old films this way but there was no strict how-to available.

So i just followed my own thoughts combined with the knowledge i read about and my own experience and mixed a HC110 dilution B at 18 degrees C in which i would soup the test strip for 5 minutes with an almost continously agitation.

The results blew me of my socks! What a great film is this! 

Here's the set-up i used for the teststrip: Minolta SRT303 with Rokkor 1.7/85, measured light with Minolta Autometer III. 

ORWO NP10 experiment: the tools by TLO-Photography

The test strip, four shots ranging from ISO4 to ISO10. Boxspeed of this film is DIN10 (hence the NP10 name) which corresponds with ISO8. Incredible but true: this gave the best result!! To give you an idea of ISO 4 in full sunlight afternoon, that is 1/8 of a second at f/5.6!

ORWO NP10 experiment: the outcome by TLO-Photography

And here's the winner, a large picture of the NP10 shot at boxspeed, imagine that, it really has expired in 1967!!! 

ORWO NP10 experiment: BOXSPEED! by TLO-Photography
  • Listening to: nothing much...
  • Reading: about film developing!
  • Playing: with cameras and lenses!
  • Eating: potato chips!
  • Drinking: Spa Rouge
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:iconveniamin:
Veniamin Featured By Owner May 6, 2015
Great results indeed!!!
But it's a different story with 120 film...
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:icontlo-photography:
TLO-Photography Featured By Owner May 6, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
thanks!
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:icontiefengeist:
tiefengeist Featured By Owner May 6, 2015   Photographer
Oh, the results look very good, yes. But the practical use of iso 8 or 10 in bright sunlight may be somewhat questionable. Anyway, it works and the film looks good, thanks to the mighty power of HC-110. Box speed looks slightly to dark for my eyes, but still usable.

How many rolls of NP10 are left? And by the way, that Autometer may be the best investion in your entire life. I own the IV version and it saved my ass countless times.
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:icontlo-photography:
TLO-Photography Featured By Owner May 6, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
In the fifties/sixties when most consumer cameras had a top speed of 1/300 a slow film was their only option in bright sunlight.

I have 2 more rolls of the NP10, and 5 NP27, there are some Agfa Isopan IF from 1974 as well. I'll test the NP27 as well before shooting. What i like particularly about the NP10 is the lack of grain, it's superb! I have some ideas of how to use it... :)

Yes, Minolta autometer series are extremely good! Can't leave home without one when using old film cameras! 
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:iconnigel-kell:
Nigel-Kell Featured By Owner May 6, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
Fun with ancient films! Of course, storage conditions make a huge difference to the usability of old film, which you don't know in this case. Such a slow film might well keep it's sensitivity for a long time if kept cold (fridge?); the lack of fog could confirm this. As a bonus, a nice picture of an obscure (in the UK, anyway) camera brand!
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:icontiefengeist:
tiefengeist Featured By Owner May 6, 2015   Photographer
I once bought some roll film from the 50s which was stored in a living room cabinet next to a CRT television for decades. It seems that the radiation of that tube completely exposed that film over roughly half a century. This is the worst case scenario that can happen to ancient film. It rarely happens, but it still does. Old film is always some kind of russian roulette.
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:icontlo-photography:
TLO-Photography Featured By Owner May 6, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
Yes, it's fun indeed! :)

It  must have been frozen all those years, the outcome is really way too good to be true if you ask  me! :) To prevent fog i used HC110, it's known to eliminate fog on old films.

The FodorFlex II might not be as obscure as you think. You might just know it by another name, Fodor was a dutch photo-shop, they had all kinds of manufacturers re-brand the products with their name in it. This one is made by Tokyo Kogaku, better known as Topcon.
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:iconnigel-kell:
Nigel-Kell Featured By Owner May 7, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
Possibly, but TLR's in general aren't terribly common in the UK, and neither are Topcons!
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:icontlo-photography:
TLO-Photography Featured By Owner May 7, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
Ok, i wonder why that is. TLR's were widely popular, ranging from cheap Lubitel ones to the expensive Rollei and Yashica models.
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:iconnigel-kell:
Nigel-Kell Featured By Owner May 8, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
Not sure, but a quick perusal of ebays TLR listings reveal numbers of Lubitel ones (probably the lomography influence), then assorted Yashica models, with the majority being made up of Rolleis and Mamiyas. I can only assume that the TLR in the UK was regarded as a serious enthusiasts camera, and those simply wanting a medium format family camera bought a folder instead; or were seduced by the new, smaller, miniature cameras and went for 35mm instead. Of course, by the seventies the aspirational camera had become the 35mm SLR, so anyone with a bit of cash bought one of those; even if it was one of the all auto point and shoot models!
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:icontlo-photography:
TLO-Photography Featured By Owner May 9, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
The Lubitel ones are indeed very popular among the Lomo people, simple cams and quite cheap. 

Rollei and Mamiya fetch high prices here, i was lucky with this one. I bought a small collection which was badly documented in the ad, there was no mention of this one in the text and on the pics, so it was quite a surprise when i unpacked the box! 
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